STRESAM ® [Etifoxine]

Side Effects

Rare allergic reactions and sleepness.

Overdose

Overdose effects have not been observed, even when increasing the active doses over 100-fold.

Note

When not treated, emotional stress tends to have physical manifestations.

Country of Manufacture: France

You can read the full instruction here

US Domestic shipping is available for this product! Choose Ships from: US size option to get it in 3-7 days to any US address. Dont forget to choose US Domestic Shipping when checking out.

Developed in the 1960s, Etofoxine was one of several anxiolytics with enough potential to replace benzodiazepine drugs. It has anxiolytic properties and can relieve various psychosomatic disorders, while not having negative effects on psychomotor and cognitive domains. From 1995 untill 2007, Etofoxine was used to treat more than 11.3 mln patients. It is approved in more than 40 countries. It also does not cause addiction, tolerance or withdrawal syndroms.

One interesting property of Etofoxine that was discovered only recently is its possible use as a neuroprotector. Etofoxine was shown to promote neuron growth; in particular, Etofoxine accelerates axonal regeneration and might be a treatment for polyneuropathy. Furthermore, Etofoxine was also proven to have the ability to alleviate mild depressions.

Overall, etofoxine is a safe drug with few side effects that has the potential to alleviate a wide range of symptoms:

  • Anxiety-asthenic disorders
  • Various psychosomatic disorders
  • Mild depressions
  • Chronic pain syndrome
  • Alcohol withdrawal syndrome
  • Country of Manufacture: France

    Legal Disclaimer

    This product has not been approved by the US FDA. All statements on this page are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the US FDA.

    This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

    1. Micallef et al (2001) A double blind parallel group placebo controlled comparison of sedative and mnesic effects of etifoxine and lorazepam in healthy subjects [corrected] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11468032
    2. Hamon et al (2003) The modulatory effects of the anxiolytic etifoxine on GABA(A) receptors are mediated by the beta subunit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12871647
    3. Nhuyen et al (2006) Efficacy of etifoxine compared to lorazepam monotherapy in the treatment of patients with adjustment disorders with anxiety: a double-blind controlled study in general practice https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16625522
    4. Ugale et al (2007) Neurosteroid allopregnanolone mediates anxiolytic effect of etifoxine in rats https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17950705
    5. Girard et al (2008) Etifoxine improves peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2629330/
    6. Verleye et al (2011) Differential effects of etifoxine on anxiety-like behaviour and convulsions in BALB/cByJ and C57BL/6J mice: any relation to overexpression of central GABAA receptor beta2 subunits? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20943351
    7. Zhou et al (2013) Etifoxine promotes glial derived neurotrophic factor induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/mmr.2013.1474
    8. Aouad et al (2014) Etifoxine stimulates allopregnanolone synthesis in the spinal cord to produce analgesia in experimental mononeuropathy https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881562
    9. Choi et al (2015) Etifoxine for pain patients with anxiety https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25589941
    10. Y Choi, K Kim (2015) Etifoxine for Pain Patients with Anxiety https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4293506/
    11. Rego et al (2015) The Non-Benzodiazepine Anxiolytic Drug Etifoxine Causes a Rapid, Receptor-Independent Stimulation of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4364751/
    12. D Stein (2015) Etifoxine Versus Alprazolam for the Treatment of Adjustment Disorder with Anxiety: a Randomized Controlled Trial https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4311065/
    13. Simon-O’Brien et al (2016) Etifoxine improves sensorimotor deficits and reduces glial activation, neuronal degeneration, and neuroinflammation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5002207/
    14. Ravikumar et al (2016) Differential efficacy of the TSPO ligands etifoxine and XBD-173 in two rodent models of Multiple Sclerosis http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/27039042
    15. Bouillot et al (2016) A microPET comparison of the effects of etifoxine and diazepam on [(11)C]flumazenil uptake in rat brains https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26644334
    16. Costa et al (2017) The Anxiolytic Etifoxine Binds to TSPO Ro5-4864 Binding Site with Long Residence Time Showing a High Neurosteroidogenic Activity https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28362078
    17. Poisbeau et al (2018) Anxiolytics targeting GABAA receptors: Insights on etifoxine https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30204559
    18. Deplanque et al (2018) Etifoxine impairs neither alertness nor cognitive functions of the elderly: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30135030


    Type: Nootropics




    CUSTOMERS WHO BOUGHT THIS PRODUCT ALSO BOUGHT